Stories to read…

scented pinks

scented pinks

I have two stories published. One is on a shortlist, and published in the new magazine called Kishboo. available to read now. That stands for

Keith and Sharon Boothroyd, who have combined to create a new online magazine. On Monday 27th, you can start voting for the stories

they have chosen for their list of contenders for the winning prize. I’d be over the moon if you read my story and clicked like please.

It’s called ‘Three Little Flowers’ and it’s special to me.

They are running an ongoing competition, that is only three-pound to enter, and prizes are £50.00 for first and £25.00 for second. Voting is on people clicking, so the more friends you have, the more likely you’ll win. So, not hoping for miracles, because they’re in the story, and that’s where I’d rather them be:))

Prepare yourself for a mammoth read that is my latest Redington story, thank you Martin West of Creative Frontiers, for publishing it.

Midnight on Colley Hill, will run as a serial, beginning on 27th October, and is a Halloween story, where three Redington girls, or more like, old girls get together for a re-union. Don’t want to give too much away, so hope you enjoy it if you read.

Stones darkerPicture courtesy of maritimephotographic.com

When Suzy met Patsy.

The travelling writer came to the N.E.C. and that’s in my radar, so how lovely that I was able to pop along and meet

my lovely blog buddy, writing buddy and critique buddy. Alright, you get the gist, I was thrilled to have a coffee and cake with Patsy.

Suzy and PatsyWhen we met, it felt like meeting a family member, and as if we’d been friends for a lifetime. I was looking around, and heard Patsy’s voice, then we went, ‘yahayyyy,,,,, ‘ like on long lost family. Great fun.

I call Patsy the Travelling Writer, because that’s what she does, and is. How glad am I that she and Gary were at the show up the road. I thought perhaps we’d have a little chat for a while, and before you know it, two hours had passed, and they were almost closing.

Great respect for Gary, who didn’t moan that I’d hijacked Patsy when they were checking out motor homes. And we didn’t really sprout flowers out of our head with happiness…

Patsy’s blog…..

Our site……

Read Patsy’s latest story here….

Welcome, Lynne Hackles.

Lynne Hackles booksLynne newLynne spell

It’s a real pleasure to welcome our writing treasure on to my blog. I have Lynne’s book, ‘writing from life,’ on my bookshelf – and if I ever need inspiration it’s one I reach for. The other two, ‘ghost writing’ and Handy hints for Writers’ are also books of mine, that I treasure, and I’d recommend them all.

Lynne’s writing career began when she had a letter published in ‘Woman’s Realm,’ the same as me. Now she has a regular column in Writing magazine, and this month, for Halloween, she tells us how to cast a writing spell, which I will be doing of course. Over to Lynne:-

Q1. S/ Lynne, I’m a massive fan of yours because I like your style, and mostly your humour. What was the title of the first fiction story that was accepted by a Woman’s magazine, and which magazine was it?

L/I’d been writing humorous articles on family life for My Weekly but was desperate to get some fiction accepted and now I can’t remember what it was. (Actually, the articles were 50% fiction) I can be excused for the lapse in memory as it was over 30 years ago (and probably written in my school exercise book and illustrated using wax crayons as I was such a baby back then). What I can tell you was that My Weekly bought it. I had followed the pattern of a published story. The main character had a problem at the beginning of the day and solved it, through her own efforts, before bedtime. My first dozen published stories all had that day-long time-span. I’ve had over 400 published now and am currently all story-ed out and working on other things.

 

S/ How long would you say it takes you to write a typical woman’s magazine story?

 
L/ Anything from an hour to twenty years. Yes, some arrive fully formed and others sit patiently in my In Progress folder and have been moved from old computer to new, several times, and eventually the bit that was missing arrives and the story gets completed.

 
S/  I enjoy your column in writing magazine each month, for the variety of topics you cover, and the common sense advice. If anyone was thinking of becoming a columnist, what advice would you give?

 
L/ Don’t! Only joking. I enjoy writing my regular features. I do five each month under different names but I sometimes get nightmares. I dream of opening up a magazine and my regular page/column is blank because I didn’t get around to writing it. So, if you want a regular column and are lucky enough to get one then be prepared to work hard, think ahead and never miss a deadline.

 
S/  I think you’d make a great agony aunt. Is that something you would do, if the opportunity came your way?

 

L/ I would LOVE it. Not sure if the troubled people writing in would though. I tend to be one of the ‘shut up moaning and get on with it’ brigade. There’s so much to be grateful for in everyone’s life. My cousin once told me I’d led a Charmed Life which goes to prove that no-one knows what goes on in anyone’s life. I never forget that. Everyone has problems and some people can’t cope with theirs while I’m like a terrier and shake mine until they’re resolved, though some can’t be and I’ve learned and am learning to live with those. If I was to be an agony aunt I’d have to remember three things – 1. To be kind 2. To be sympathetic and 3. Not everyone is as strong as I am.

 
S/  Recently, you were the writer in residence at Creative Frontiers. Did they provide you with your own writing room, or did you mingle, and what’s the food like over there?

 
L/ They put me in a padded cell and force-fed me chocolate.

 

S/  Am I right in thinking you are a tutor for writing magazine? If so, what’s the most common mistake you see in fiction stories that would stop an editor buying that story?

 
L/ I’ve been a tutor for Writers’ News Home Study courses for 20 years now. Once I realised how long it was I started hinting about a gold clock. No-one’s taken it on board so far. I enjoy teaching students and have had many successes but some make the same mistakes over and over. I’d say the most common are Telling instead of Showing (if you’re not sure, go to my writer in residence workshops on Creative Frontiers and read all about it) and what I call Cinderella syndrome. That’s where the main character does nothing about their problems and someone else steps in (fairy-godmother) and does the solving for them. If I’d written Cinderella she’d had got off her backside, ripped down some curtains, made a dress for herself and hopped on a bus to get to the ball.

 
Thanks, Lynne for taking the time to answer these questions.
Thank you for asking me and giving me the opportunity to leave my WIP and do something different and frivolous. I like frivolous.

You can read more about Lynne and what she gets up to from the links below. She also has a monthly slot on Creative Frontiers.

www.lynnehackles.com
www.lynnehackles.blogspot.com
Racing Start – a Kindle best-seller. Fast paced cycling fiction for 8-12 yr olds
Handy Hints for Writers – Compass Books
Writing From Life – How To Books
Ghostwriting – Aber Publishing
http://creative-frontiers.com/blog/writing-desk/fiction/

Thank you Lynne for a great interview. And glad you’re a fellow giggle blogger as well…

October giggle blog.

At work the other day, it came to the time of cleaning the canteen in a factory where we have to enter a code to get through the door. Most places have codes now, and it’s a task in itself to remember them all.

On this particular morning, I marched up to the door, hoover in hand and hose wrapped round my neck, confident I’d remembered the order of numbers. Plonking Henry down, I said to my friend from Sunderland; “I know this code,” tapped it in, then added, “The door is really stiff.” Another time, I had the right code, and couldn’t open it, and a chap had told me it was stiff, and you have to give it a really good shove.

So I leaned back, and threw all my weight behind it and shoved. Now somebody must have oiled the door, because I shot through it like Peter Sellers and Kato in one of the Pink Panther films, and almost fell up the stairs that are a good ten feet on from the door. Good job nobody was on the other side, and I wish they’d let you know when they oil the doors.

Peter Sellers charging through a door….

I fancied eating a gingerbread man, so after looking in my recipe books, (I’m old fashioned like that) I googled a recipe, and found a good one on the bbc website. It made 16, though the recipe said 20. Mine were slightly thicker than they should have been, but I won’t hold that against them, I made them that way. So a few days later, I had a dream that I was in one of the places we clean, another factory, different from the above, and a giant gingerbread man came walking out of the gents toilets. He said to me, “Do you think it’s right, what you’re doing?” I said, “What do you mean?” He said, “You’re eating all of my friends.” I said, “Well, I fancied one.” Then he plodded off into the factory. It wasn’t easy eating all the rest after that.

gingermenLittle gingerbread chaps, tasty and soft.

Do you want to join the growing list of gigglers? All you have to do is post at the beginning of each month, something that’s made you laugh lately. If nothing has, then you’re not looking hard enough.

Here are the other lovely gigglers, and welcome Jacqueline King to the giggle list.

Lynne Hackles, and on Lynne’s blog you get a giggle from Sue Blackburn.

Teresa Ashby, who always has something to make us giggle.

A lady who joined the gigglers from Teresa’s blog is also a giggler. I need to find her and add her link here.

Jacqueline King. Who gave me the idea for giggle blog, as she said I made her giggle.

Mrs Teapot on the busy teapot blog. Hope the kettle’s on.

 

Coming soon, Author interview with writing treasure, Lynne Hackles.

 

Scarecrow Weekend.

It’s been a weekend of scarecrows in our local village. Here’s some pictures of the wide variety there were. Some would make great book covers wouldn’t they? And some were very real, like the lady in blue in the church. I was having a conversation with someone sitting down, and I thought, ‘blimey, this woman’s getting a bit close’ she was a scarecrow of course.

The wedding party in the church won. I only popped in for a cup of tea, and ended up with a lovely cushion, and cakes, and a book on the history of the church.

One day, years ago, me and our son, while out walking dogs, came across a hidden grave-yard. Turns out that two hundred years ago, the church was there, where the old stones were.

Speaking of hidden grave-yards, I’m working on my next Redington tale, which will be a Halloween story. ‘Midnight on Colley Hill, or it might be, Midnight on Colley Heath, as Norfolk is flat…… Haven’t a clue how it’s going to go yet, but I have my quote at the beginning, so that’s a start.

scarecrowscarecrwo scarebinscarfamilybillyscar

Imagine if you were visiting the village on a dark night, could be scary. They were bad enough in the bright light of day. Good fun though.

The wedding party won the prize. humptypilotdad's armydracula

The Ghost of Windmill Walk.

windmillMy latest story in the Redington collection is published this week on Creative Frontiers.

Hope you enjoy the story if you read it, and thanks to my writing buddies for their help as well.

The accumulator competition is ending at the end of this month, so be quick and good luck if you’re having a go. Scroll down

the page, and follow instructions for part 3 of the Riggins story.

Speaking of competitions, the Alfie dog short story one is closing soon as well, with a fab prize, so good luck if you’re

trying that one as well.

Happy Equinox, now excuse me, hot cakes are out of the oven, and a cup of tea waiting as well.

ghostWatch out for the ghost of the windmill…